ADA Compliance
The City of St. Augustine remains committed to providing accessibility to all and provides for handicapped accessible parking in the city. For a map of accessible parking locations, Click Here To notify the city regarding accessibility concerns contact: Will Franke, Building Official, Phn: 904.825.1065, Fax: 904.209.4335, Email: wfranke@citystaug.com; or Todd Grant, Public Works Deputy Director, Phn: 904.825.1040, Fax: 904.209.4286, Email: tgrant@citystaug.com. You may also write either of these contacts at City of St. Augustine, P.O. Box 210, St. Augustine, FL 32085-0210.

Consumer Confidence Report
The City of St. Augustine remains committed to providing clean and safe drinking water. For the previous year's sampling results please click here. To notify the city regarding water treatment concerns contact: Patrick Timoney, Water Treatment Plant Supervisor, Phn: 904.825.1044, Fax: 904.823-2280, Email: ptimoney@citystaug.com; or woperators@citystaug.com, or write the City of St. Augustine, P.O. Box 210, St. Augustine, FL 32085-0210.

Roseate Spoonbills enjoying feeding time in the estuaries of the San Sebastian River early in the morning.

Roseate Spoonbill Named Official City Bird

Aside from being the only species of spoonbill in the Western Hemisphere, and from receiving such accolades as “beautiful” and “graceful” by none other than John James Audubon in the early 19th century, the Roseate Spoonbill has received another tribute, this one from the St. Augustine City Commission when that body named the bird as the city’s official bird.

In a unanimous vote at its meeting on Monday, August 27, the Commission agreed that the stunning and unique bird which is often seen in the waters of the San Sebastian and Matanzas Rivers, was worthy of being named as the first ever official city bird for the Nation’s Oldest City.

The plume trade of the late 19th century nearly decimated the Roseate Spoonbill as hunters destroyed the birds by the thousands to provide its pink feathers for the manufacture of fans and women’s hats. By the 1930’s there were a mere 15 breeding pairs identified in the State of Florida, but today those numbers are estimated to exceed 1,000. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission currently list the birds as a Species of Special Concern with its biggest threat being diminishing habitats.

In naming the bird as the city’s official bird, the Commission stated that its action was “...in recognition of its shared characteristics with the Nation’s Oldest City: its exceptional beauty, its rich history and its uncommon ability to survive in the face of seemingly overwhelming odds.”

For more information on the Roseate Spoonbill visit the web site for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

To read a description by John James Audubon, visit the web site for the National Audubon Society.

To read the complete resolution passed by the St. Augustine City Commission, click here.

 

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