ADA Compliance
The City of St. Augustine remains committed to providing accessibility to all and provides for handicapped accessible parking in the city. For a map of accessible parking locations, Click Here To notify the city regarding accessibility concerns contact: Will Franke, Building Official, Phn: 904.825.1065, Fax: 904.209.4335, Email: wfranke@citystaug.com; or Todd Grant, Public Works Deputy Director, Phn: 904.825.1040, Fax: 904.209.4286, Email: tgrant@citystaug.com. You may also write either of these contacts at City of St. Augustine, P.O. Box 210, St. Augustine, FL 32085-0210.

Consumer Confidence Report
The City of St. Augustine remains committed to providing clean and safe drinking water. For the previous year's sampling results please click here. To notify the city regarding water treatment concerns contact: Patrick Timoney, Water Treatment Plant Supervisor, Phn: 904.825.1044, Fax: 904.823-2280, Email: ptimoney@citystaug.com; or woperators@citystaug.com, or write the City of St. Augustine, P.O. Box 210, St. Augustine, FL 32085-0210.

 

 

Earth Hour’s message practiced
every day at city’s parking facility

City’s message: “Lights out for an hour to start;

find ways to conserve forever.”

On Saturday, March 23 at 8:30pm local time, businesses, households and governmental entities in communities all over the world will participate in the seventh annual Earth Hour by turning out lights for one hour as a way to show support for environmentally sustainable action. Earth Hour, an initiative of the World Wildlife Fund, began in 2007 in one city, Sidney, Australia, and by last year involved hundreds of millions of people in 152 countries across every continent.

The City of St. Augustine will participate by darkening the flood lights that provide up-lighting for the front of City Hall, but instead of a single hour, the city will darken the lights for the entire weekend including Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights.

Though not planned, the Earth Hour date nearly coincides with the first anniversary of the city’s putting into action the message Earth Hour was created to communicate: environmental sustainability. And just like Earth Hour, it has to do with saving energy through more efficient use of lighting.

During its first year, the Historic Downtown Parking Facility, the city’s only parking garage, experienced a cost of operating its more than 500 light fixtures in excess of $100,000. Since the facility is open 24 hours a day every day of the year, lighting for vehicular and pedestrian safety was essential. Turing lights off was not an option, so the city looked at alternative lighting sources.

Working with Shaffer Engineering Group, the city replaced the old-technology of high-pressure sodium fixtures with light-emitting diodes (LED) which consume much less electricity. Additionally, motion sensors were installed so that lights remain on a low setting until motion is detected, at which time they rise to full brightness for a set period of time. If further motion is detected during the interval, the timer resets itself and repeats the process until no further movement is detected, then returns to the low setting. Ambient light sensors were also installed which constantly measure daylight so that if enough is present, the sensor maintains the lighting in low mode regardless of detected motion.

The cost for the initial project, which involved replacing the lights on the second, third and fourth floors was $318,000 of which $250,000 was paid with a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. Based on the immediate cost saving, the first floor was added to the project at an additional cost of $90,000.

The result of using smart technology? A savings in excess of 60% the first month of full operation and now, after a full year, the facility’s electric consumption and cost of electricity has dropped by half to approximately $50,000 annually. At that rate, the city’s portion of the project’s cost will be recouped in its entirety in just a little over three years time.

“Lights out for an hour to start; find ways to conserve forever,” is the message the city is sharing for Earth Hour 2013 in hopes that businesses and residents will participate for one hour as a first step towards finding ways to conserve energy every day.

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